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Heart Failure

 

Cardiovascular research has traditionally focused on hard clinical endpoints such as markers of disease progression, adverse events and death. But now researchers are calling for more studies that incorporate the viewpoints of patients and caregivers, both in trial design and execution and in measuring outcomes like quality of life, time off work, out-of-pocket expense and caregiver burden.

Digital tracking devices can motivate patients to increase their physical activity outside of structured cardiac rehabilitation, a new study suggests.

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) strikes black women harder than other races, both in frequency and the ability to recover, according to a report published in JAMA Cardiology.

Analyzing mitochondrial DNA copy numbers (mtDNA-CN) in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease could help clinicians predict sudden cardiac death and heart failure in patients up to a decade before anything happens, a study published in JAMA: Cardiology reports.

Tai chi proved to be safe and enjoyable in a small study of patients who declined traditional cardiac rehabilitation, suggesting the Chinese martial art could be an alternative exercise option.

 

Recent Headlines

Researchers call for more patient-centered designs, outcomes in cardiovascular trials

Cardiovascular research has traditionally focused on hard clinical endpoints such as markers of disease progression, adverse events and death. But now researchers are calling for more studies that incorporate the viewpoints of patients and caregivers, both in trial design and execution and in measuring outcomes like quality of life, time off work, out-of-pocket expense and caregiver burden.

Digital trackers help cardiac rehab patients boost activity on their own time

Digital tracking devices can motivate patients to increase their physical activity outside of structured cardiac rehabilitation, a new study suggests.

Cardiologists set to present new data at China congress

Chinese cardiologists will be presenting their latest data on cardiovascular disease at the 28th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology this weekend.

Mitochondrial DNA could more accurately predict 10-year risk for heart failure

Analyzing mitochondrial DNA copy numbers (mtDNA-CN) in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease could help clinicians predict sudden cardiac death and heart failure in patients up to a decade before anything happens, a study published in JAMA: Cardiology reports.

Black women face double the risk of pregnancy-related heart failure

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) strikes black women harder than other races, both in frequency and the ability to recover, according to a report published in JAMA Cardiology.

Tai chi shows potential as cardiac rehab exercise

Tai chi proved to be safe and enjoyable in a small study of patients who declined traditional cardiac rehabilitation, suggesting the Chinese martial art could be an alternative exercise option.

Some cardiologists equate LVAD deactivation to physician-assisted suicide

Beliefs regarding deactivation of left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) differ significantly between cardiologists and hospice and palliative medicine clinicians (HPMCs), leading to incoherent end-of-life care for some patients, according to a new study in the Journal of Cardiac Failure.

Elderly patients at increased risk for heart failure in cold weather

Elderly patients with a history of cardiovascular disease might want to limit outdoor activities this winter season, according to a group of researchers in Quebec. Their recent study showed that risk of heart failure in older populations can increase as temperature drops.

Lowest volume LVAD centers associated with worse survival

The authors of a new study suggested CMS revise its standards for left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation based on patients from the lowest-volume centers demonstrating worse 90-day survival outcomes.

Umbilical cord stem cells could treat heart failure

A new treatment using stem cells from the umbilical cord increased ejection fraction and improved quality of life in heart failure patients, according to a study published in Circulation Research.

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