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Healthcare Economics

 

A new assessment from the American Heart Association (AHA) questions whether investments in heart disease research benefits the overall costs of healthcare and patient needs.

Patients who are hospitalized once are likely to be hospitalized again, but patients with heart failure are at an even greater risk. Plus, it’s costly.

The partnering of physicians and vendors has created and improved modern medicine. Collaborations have dawned new devices, systems, drugs, innovations and ways of diagnosing, treating and managing patients. Every day these advancements help to save and improve patient lives. But as we well know, partnership over the years also has overly feathered the pockets of some and bred a fair amount of fraud.

Medicare now covers a supervised exercise therapy for peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to CMS, a decision that will likely result in other insurers following this example.

Harvard Pilgrim Health Care signed an outcomes-based refund contract with Amgen pertaining to evolocumab (Repatha), the company’s cholesterol-lowering medication.

 

Recent Headlines

ACC 'deeply concerned' by Senate healthcare bill; AHA calls for 'no' vote

The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released its report on the Senate’s version of an Affordable Care Act repeal-and-replace plan, projecting 22 million more people would uninsured by 2026 while deductibles and premiums would increase significantly. In response, the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology have announced opposition to the legislation, dubbed the Better Care Reconciliation Act (BCRA).

AHA argues funding cardiac research now could save billions later

A new assessment from the American Heart Association (AHA) questions whether investments in heart disease research benefits the overall costs of healthcare and patient needs.

Improved quality interventions for heart failure patients linked to reduced readmissions, varying costs

Patients who are hospitalized once are likely to be hospitalized again, but patients with heart failure are at an even greater risk. Plus, it’s costly.

Physician-vendors partner for patient good

The partnering of physicians and vendors has created and improved modern medicine. Collaborations have dawned new devices, systems, drugs, innovations and ways of diagnosing, treating and managing patients. Every day these advancements help to save and improve patient lives. But as we well know, partnership over the years also has overly feathered the pockets of some and bred a fair amount of fraud.

Medicare now covers non-invasive peripheral artery disease treatment

Medicare now covers a supervised exercise therapy for peripheral artery disease (PAD), according to CMS, a decision that will likely result in other insurers following this example.

AHA awards $2 million to cardiac research at top universities

The American Heart Association (AHA) announced May 19 that it will donate two $1 million research grants to support research on medications and high blood pressure.

ACC president emphasizes access to insurance, quality care in letter to Senate

The repeal-and-replace program for the Affordable Care Act (ACA) has passed through the U.S. House of Representatives, meaning the Senate will soon begin work on comprehensive legislation. Debate remains just how much the Senate will take from the House’s American Health Care Act.

Amgen, Harvard Pilgrim sign outcomes-based refund contract for cardiovascular medication

Harvard Pilgrim Health Care signed an outcomes-based refund contract with Amgen pertaining to evolocumab (Repatha), the company’s cholesterol-lowering medication.

75% of cardiologists received industry-related payments in 2015

An analysis of Open Payments reports found that 74.9 percent of cardiologists in the U.S. received industry-related payments in 2015, representing the highest proportion within physician specialties.

Favorable middle-age cardiovascular health reduces costs, improves long-term outcomes

Adults who had favorable cardiovascular health in early middle age lived an average of 3.9 years longer, survived 4.5 years longer before developing a chronic illness and saved nearly $18,000 in Medicare costs compared with those with two or more risk factors at middle age, according to a longitudinal cohort study.

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