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Healthcare Economics

 

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) submitted comments to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on Sept. 6 regarding the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) for 2017.

Recently, it’s become more popular to offer smokers cash or financial incentives to quit the addictive habit. So far, the results have been mixed, although a study of low-income smokers in Switzerland showed that offering money could be effective in certain populations.

A simulation model of U.S. adults found that proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors were not cost-effective in patients with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) or atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD).

After several months of buildup, the CMS Hospital Compare website began to offer overall hospital star ratings July 27. According to the agency, the system is meant to offer patients a way to quickly and uniformly compare potential hospitals.

The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) announced on July 25 a five-year proposed bundled payments model for hospitals that treat Medicare patients following an MI or bypass surgery. CMS also announced a proposed five-year cardiac rehabilitation incentive payment model to encourage hospitals to refer patients to cardiac rehabilitation.

 

 

Recent Headlines

HCI3 not pleased with CMS’s new bundled payment plan for cardiology treatments

The Health Care Incentives Improvement Institute (HCI3) isn’t happy about a new proposed regulation by CMS, which HCI3 thinks would limit the its ability to improve care and budget patient treatment.

Medtronic hires Mark Ploof as senior vice president

Medtronic hired Mark Ploof as senior vice president of global operations and business operations.

3 reasons patients should call 9-1-1 when having a heart attack

There’s no way to sugar coat it: Ambulance rides are expensive. According to a 2012 report by the U.S. Government Accountability Office, ambulance rides can range from $224 to $2,204 per transport for Medicare beneficiaries. Despite their cost, when experiencing chest pains, the fare is worth the life-saving outcome.

Intensive blood pressure management may be cost-effective

An analysis found that intensive blood pressure management for patients with hypertension and an increased risk for cardiovascular events costs $23,777 per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained.

ACC submits comments to CMS regarding payment proposals

The American College of Cardiology (ACC) submitted comments to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) on Sept. 6 regarding the Hospital Outpatient Prospective Payment System (OPPS) for 2017.

Aralez purchases U.S. and Canadian rights to sell Merck’s oral cardiovascular medication

Aralez Pharmaceuticals acquired the rights from Merck to sell vorapaxar (Zontivity) in the U.S. and Canada.

Diabetes medical equipment companies to pay more than $12 million to resolve criminal allegations

Two companies and two executives at those firms agreed to pay more than $12.2 million to resolve allegations that they made illegal, unsolicited telephone calls trying to sell diabetes-related medical equipment to Medicare beneficiaries.

Cost-effectiveness of CardioMEMS device for heart failure remains questionable

Patients with heart failure may benefit from treatment with the CardioMEMS device, a miniaturized implantable system that monitors pulmonary artery pressures. However, a recent analysis found that the evidence was lacking because of potential confounders.

St. Jude Medical sues two companies, three individuals for false statements about cardiac devices

St. Jude Medical announced on Sept. 7 that the company had filed a lawsuit against an investment research firm, a startup cybersecurity research firm and three employees of those companies for false statements about St. Jude’s implantable cardiac devices.

Offering financial incentives may help smokers quit cigarettes, improve health

Recently, it’s become more popular to offer smokers cash or financial incentives to quit the addictive habit. So far, the results have been mixed, although a study of low-income smokers in Switzerland showed that offering money could be effective in certain populations.

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