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Healthcare Economics & Policy

 

Edwards Lifesciences has purchased Baltimore-based Harpoon Medical for an initial $100 million, with the potential for up to $150 million more to be disbursed in milestone-driven payments over the next 10 years. Edwards announced the acquisition Dec. 6, hailing the addition of Harpoon’s mitral valve repair device to its product line.

Low- to middle-income countries (LMICs) spend billions of collective dollars each year on healthcare, Journal of the American College of Cardiology editor-in-chief Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, and colleagues wrote in a recent JACC article—but they aren’t necessarily spending those funds effectively.

At a time when chronic disease is eclipsing infectious outbreaks, the United States is working to find its role in the worldwide healthcare conversation.

CMS announced Nov. 30 it has finalized the cancellation of mandatory cardiac bundled payment programs and plans to introduce voluntary bundles soon.

An interim final rule issued Nov. 29 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will allow schools to serve low-fat, flavored milk and ease requirements for sodium reduction and whole-grain offerings beginning with the 2018-19 school year.

 

Recent Headlines

Edwards Lifesciences buys Harpoon Medical for up to $250M

Edwards Lifesciences has purchased Baltimore-based Harpoon Medical for an initial $100 million, with the potential for up to $150 million more to be disbursed in milestone-driven payments over the next 10 years. Edwards announced the acquisition Dec. 6, hailing the addition of Harpoon’s mitral valve repair device to its product line.

4 changes for global governments to slash healthcare spending

Low- to middle-income countries (LMICs) spend billions of collective dollars each year on healthcare, Journal of the American College of Cardiology editor-in-chief Valentin Fuster, MD, PhD, and colleagues wrote in a recent JACC article—but they aren’t necessarily spending those funds effectively.

5 ways the U.S. fits into the future of global CVD management

At a time when chronic disease is eclipsing infectious outbreaks, the United States is working to find its role in the worldwide healthcare conversation.

CMS finalizes cancellation of cardiac bundles

CMS announced Nov. 30 it has finalized the cancellation of mandatory cardiac bundled payment programs and plans to introduce voluntary bundles soon.

AHA: Changes to school lunch requirements reverse progress

An interim final rule issued Nov. 29 by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) will allow schools to serve low-fat, flavored milk and ease requirements for sodium reduction and whole-grain offerings beginning with the 2018-19 school year.

Altering prices of 7 food groups could save 23K lives per year in US

Altering the prices of seven major food groups could save more than 23,000 lives a year in the United States by slashing cardiometabolic risks, a study published in BMC Medicine this week reports.

Some forms of preventive CV screening increased after ACA; gender gap remains

Physicians have increased preventive screening for some cardiovascular risk factors since the Affordable Care Act (ACA) took effect, a new study found, but women remain less likely than men to receive aspirin therapy to guard against heart attack and stroke.

5 healthcare models that would facilitate co-management of primary care, cardiology

Five newly proposed care and payment models could ease Americans’ worries about affordability and quality care in their health system, according to a review published in JAMA Cardiology this month.

Medtronic CEO: 2nd quarter revenues ‘encouraging’ given hurricanes, wildfires

Medtronic reported worldwide revenue of $7.05 billion for the second quarter of fiscal year 2018, a decrease of 4 percent driven by the sale of its Patient Care, Deep Vein Thrombosis (Compression) and Nutritional Insufficiency businesses to Cardinal Health at the beginning of the quarter.

‘Missed opportunity’: Researchers highlight variability of CPR training in US high schools

Despite a growing number of states requiring high school students to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), nearly 700,000 students graduate each year without receiving training due to lack of legislation, according to a review published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

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