News

South Korean researchers are working on packing the ability to monitor heart health and detect signs of atrial fibrillation into what might be the smallest cardiology wearable to date: a “smart ring.”

The bioresorbable vascular scaffold, once an exciting prospect for cardiologists, saw a unique rise and fall in popularity within a year of its introduction to the CV market.

While the clinical case for cardiac PET is compelling, it also has to be feasible from a financial and logistical standpoint.

Atrial fibrillation patients with coronary artery disease pose a delicate balancing act for physicians. A growing awareness of bleeding vs. ischemic risks could soon lead to a steadier therapeutic response.

Where I live in Pennsylvania, not far from the “Heroin Highway,” the local news delivers frequent but superficial glimpses of the impact of the opioid epidemic on families and our communities. Statistics underscore such stories: More than 70,000 drug over-dose deaths just in 2017 with an associated “economic burden” exceeding $78 billion per year. 

As rates of infective endocarditis among intravenous drug users skyrocket, cardiologists are finding that treating the heart condition without addressing the disease of addiction contributes to readmissions and mortality. 

Earning approval to use a new cardiovascular drug in the clinical setting can cost 100+ times the average of bringing other medications to market.  

Telehealth enthusiasts are optimistic about telestenting’s potential to solve access-to-care issues but concede that significant obstacles must be overcome before it will be ready for prime time.

Clinical trials presented at ACC.19 flipped the script on TAVR vs. SAVR. 

The global market for transcatheter treatment of the mitral and aortic valves is expected to increase from $4 billion to $8 billion in the next five years, but barriers exist. 

BioCardia’s AVANCE steerable introducer family has received FDA 510(k) clearance, the company announced May 8.

Research presented at the Heart Rhythm Society’s 40th annual scientific sessions in San Francisco May 7 suggests heart patients with implanted electronic devices know less about their therapies than they think they do.