Features

Are enough resources available to treat the growing population of adults with congenital heart disease?   

As risk-sharing agreements become more common, hospitals and physicians are focusing on teamwork and attention to metrics.  

With physicians and administrators ever more focused on high-quality medicine and the financial bottom line, what trends and strategies are shaping the future of the cardiovascular service line? Let’s take a look at the future forecast through the expert eyes of Brian Contos, an executive director of The Advisory Board Company. Is your program poised to take advantage of changing market dynamics such as outpatient care, reimbursement and payment policies? And what about implantables, MACRA patient-focused care and interventional procedures like Protected PCI?

Ask cardiologists to name the big advances of the past decade, and many point to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and other breakthroughs that are allowing cardiologists to treat structural heart disease with minimally invasive procedures. Looking ahead, some believe that even bigger, broader changes are coming.

After decades of steady progress pushing back the leading cause of death and disability, cardiologists are striving to achieve the Quadruple Aim as they prepare for a tidal wave of aging patients with multiple chronic conditions. Bellwether hospitals are rethinking old systems and carving out new pathways for managing “Chronic America.”

Recent medical group compensation and productivity data surveys fielded by AMGA suggest trends for practices to watch.

The business of cardiology was at the forefront of discussion at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) Cath Lab Leadership Boot Camp in May. Speakers focused on the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA), bundled payment models and value-based reimbursement. Here are a few of the lessons attendees took back to their practices.

When implementing new technologies, success sometimes hinges on how quickly and efficiently we collect, analyze and react to data.

Cardiology’s Shark Tank will be back for its fourth year when TCT convenes Oct. 29-Nov. 2, in Denver. Program Director Juan F. Granada, MD, shares insights from the conference’s innovation competition.

Pediatric cardiologists say they can use telemedicine to improve patient care and ease the burden on patients’ families. But with the costs of these programs stretching into the hundreds of thousands, and a patchwork of reimbursement and regulations to contend with, what does it take to find success with pediatric telecardiology?

With the passage of MACRA and introduction of new reimbursement models, hospitals are analyzing the costs and benefits of sending patients to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs).

Some hospital systems are considering offering integrated vein care centers. One of the challenges they face is uncertainty about reimbursement.