Sleeper in Seattle: A standout for hypertension

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 - High blood pressure, hypertension

Seattle may be the best place to live if keeping blood pressure at a healthy range is your priority. The home device maker iHealth reported that 19.6 percent of patients in Seattle had high blood pressure, well below the national average of 36.3 percent.

In honor of National Blood Pressure Education Month, iHealth partnered with the EHR company Practice Fusion to calculate the percentage of patients in 17 major cities in the U.S. who were diagnosed with high blood pressure. The analysis also measured the percentage of patients with high blood pressure who had their blood pressure under control.

Eleven cities beat the national average for healthy blood pressure with Austin, Texas, and San Diego virtually tied for second place at 27.7 percent and 27.8 percent, respectively. Columbus, Ohio, and Philadelphia had the highest proportion of patients with high blood pressure, at 58 percent and 51.7 percent, respectively.

But Columbus also had the highest percentage of patients with high blood pressure under control, at 73.9 percent. The national average is 63.1 percent in the analysis. Columbus was among six cities recording percentages higher than the national average for controlled high blood pressure.

Only three cities—Austin, Denver and Phoenix—had the winning combination of a lower than average proportion of patients with high blood pressure and higher than average proportion of patients achieving blood pressure goals.

The analysis was based on diagnosis and visits in 2013 with a goal defined as systolic blood pressure of less than 140 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure of less than 90 mm Hg.