A new survey from University of Utah Health revealed that most physicians feel responsible for educating patients about the cost of care but don’t believe they should be held accountable for it.
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued a Grade I recommendation for screening peripheral artery disease (PAD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk with the ankle-brachial index (ABI), indicating current evidence is insufficient to recommend screening without signs or symptoms of disease.
Blacks who survive in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA) are 28 percent less likely to live to one year after discharge and 33 percent less likely to survive five years when compared to white counterparts, suggesting a disparity in follow-up care.
July 10, 2018 | Practice Management
The proportion of cardiology practices that are integrated with a hospital or health system has grown by 34 percent in the last decade—matching the most dramatic growth of any specialty, according to a study in the July edition of Health Affairs.
A federal investigation into the potential overuse of primary prevention implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) appears to have made hospitals more judicious in their use of the devices, according to a study published July 3 in the Journal of the American Medical Association.
The thinking behind the Seattle Proportional Risk Model goes like this: As the annual risk for all-cause mortality increases, the likelihood that the death will be sudden—or something an ICD could prevent—goes down.
Safety-net hospitals (SNHs) and smaller facilities were less likely to participate in the voluntary Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) programs for cardiac services than larger centers with catheterization laboratories. These findings indicate that the outcomes observed from these programs may not be broadly applicable.
A pair of point/counterpoint articles published online June 25 in JACC: Heart Failure debated whether the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) has resulted in greater mortality for heart failure patients or whether those observations stem from incomplete or misconstrued evidence.
June 26, 2018 | Practice Management
Extended reality technologies can be used to educate patients, their families and medical students about cardiac anatomy, facilitate pre-procedural planning and intraprocedural visualization, and serve as a rehabilitation tool for stroke survivors, according to a review published in JACC: Basic to Translational Science.
June 22, 2018 | Heart Failure
Heart failure patients treated at hospitals with lower 30-day mortality rates also enjoy a survival benefit one, three and even five years later, suggesting a short-term risk-standardized mortality rate (RSMR) may deserve additional weight in CMS’s financial incentive programs.
Providers were just as likely to perform low-value coronary revascularizations after joining an accountable care organization (ACO), a new analysis found. Considering ACOs are designed to curb healthcare spending, these findings suggest their current setup doesn’t properly incentivize specialists to change their behavior.
June 19, 2018 | Lipids & Metabolic
A single blood sample to test both fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) may be sufficient to identify people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, according to a study published June 19 in the Annals of Internal Medicine.
June 18, 2018 | Heart Failure
Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center in Houston reopened its heart transplant program June 15 after a two-week suspension in which the hospital conducted an internal review of two recent patient deaths.
June 18, 2018 | Practice Management
A recent study in BMJ Open affirmed the value of physicians dressing the part, showing patients are more likely to consider them trustworthy and knowledgeable if they are wearing the traditional white coat over formal clothing.
June 18, 2018 | Practice Management
Combining financial incentives, personalized goal setting and wearable devices might be an effective way of encouraging heart disease patients to engage in more physical activity, according to new research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.
An early discharge strategy with rivaroxaban reduces hospital lengths of stay and healthcare costs for patients with low-risk pulmonary embolism (LRPE)—without compromising their safety—suggests a study published in Academic Emergency Medicine.
Vascular & Endovascular, Practice Management, Healthcare Economics & Policy
Medical device company Stryker filed a claim with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Wednesday saying it is not in discussions with Boston Scientific on a potential takeover.
Healthcare Economics & Policy, Practice Management
The American Medical Association House of Delegates pledged on June 11 to advance gender equity in medicine after multiple studies highlighted the wage gap and discrimination women physicians continue to face.
Healthcare Economics & Policy, Practice Management, Conferences
Jun 13, 2018 | Practice Management
The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) issued a Grade D recommendation against screening with resting or exercise electrocardiography (ECG) to prevent cardiovascular disease events in asymptomatic adults at low risk of CVD events.
Practice Management
Jun 12, 2018 | Practice Management
A Cleveland-area cardiologist who is currently serving a 20-year prison sentence for healthcare fraud, money laundering and subjecting patients to unnecessary testing is asking a judge to overturn his case, reports Cleveland.com.
Practice Management
Jun 07, 2018 | Practice Management
Risk adjustment models for acute myocardial infarction (AMI) used by CMS suggest a diagnosis of atherosclerosis is associated with about a 40 percent reduction in 30-day mortality for Medicare beneficiaries. Researchers found hospitals that provide more extensive cardiac care are more likely to report the condition, thereby skewing the risk models.
Practice Management, Healthcare Economics & Policy, Coronary Intervention & Surgery