Lipids & Metabolic

Socioeconomic stress could have a major impact on black young adults’ heart health, according to a new study published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

After spending nearly six years researching the relationship between metabolically healthy obesity and risk of cardiovascular disease, a team of U.K. doctors are suggesting that even “healthy” obese individuals are more prone to develop heart issues.

Children exposed to toxic dust after the attack on New York's World Trade Centers in 2001 are showing early signs of cardiovascular risks, a study suggests.

Apparently, it’s possible to have too much of a good thing. At least that’s what researchers are suggesting about high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, widely known as the “good” type of cholesterol.

The diabetes drug liraglutide (Victoza) secured an indication from the FDA to reduce the risk of major adverse cardiovascular (CV) events in adults with Type 2 diabetes and established cardiovascular disease, Novo Nordisk announced Aug. 25.

Patients with advanced renal dysfunction received no significant benefit from statin therapy following acute MI in a study of 861 individuals.

Nearly nine in 10 patients with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) could improve their cholesterol levels with oral-only treatment, according to a new study.

Potentially modifiable midlife vascular risk factors could be associated with dementia later in life, according to a study.

In an effort to address the growing number of overweight and obese children in the U.S., the American Academy of Pediatrics, (AAP) is now recommending that pediatricians turn their attention to cardiometabolic risk factors associated with the condition.

The diabetes epidemic continues to spread across the United States—but not as quickly as it once had, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)’s 2017 National Diabetes Statistics Report.

New research suggests that small health improvements, like not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight, are associated with a lower risk of hypertension among black patients, compared to those that don't practice a healthy lifestyle.

Researchers from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, announced new findings that suggest smaller doses of a few blood pressure medications could be just as effective as standard doses of just one.