Hypertension

A study published in the New England Journal of Medicine July 18 suggests it may be time for the medical community to rethink its perception of diastolic blood pressure, which has long been considered inferior to systolic BP as a measure of cardiovascular wellness.

Massachusetts-based Azurity Pharmaceuticals announced July 10 it had received FDA approval for Katerzia Oral Suspension, making the drug the first and only FDA-approved amlodipine oral suspension to hit the commercial market.

Research published in Hypertension July 1 suggests a vitamin D deficiency in early childhood could translate to an increased risk of high blood pressure in adolescence.

CMS on July 2 announced its finalized national coverage policy for ambulatory blood pressure monitoring—one that extends coverage to patients with suspected masked hypertension and aligns CMS’ BP thresholds with the latest society guidelines.

Sportswear brand Under Armour filed a patent application this week for a new “smart” shoe that’s able to take a wearer’s blood pressure and help them recover faster from a workout.

Online pharmacy Valisure on June 13 issued a letter to the FDA after in-house testing revealed dangerously elevated levels of N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) in certain lots of valsartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB) commonly used to treat hypertension and heart failure.

The antihypertensive drug nilvadipine may benefit Alzheimer’s patients by encouraging blood flow to the brain, slowing the progression of the disease while reducing blood pressure in the hippocampus, researchers reported in Hypertension June 17.

A 25-minute steam in the sauna could be just as beneficial for heart health as a moderate physical workout, researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg and the Medical Center Berlin have found.

Teva Pharmaceuticals is pulling six bulk lots of its angiotensin II receptor blocker losartan from the market after testing revealed dangerously high levels of N-Nitroso-N-methyl-4-aminobutyric acid, a probable human carcinogen, in the drugs.

Harvard researchers have identified three health interventions that, if implemented and followed closely over the next quarter-century, could prevent up to 94 million early deaths from noncommunicable diseases like CVD.

Heart patients with untreated white coat hypertension are more than twice as likely to die from cardiovascular disease as their normotensive counterparts, according to a June 11 study.

Active-duty Army personnel in the U.S. have poorer cardiovascular health than the larger civilian population, researchers have found—especially when it comes to blood pressure.