Acute Coronary Syndrome

Heart attack patients aged 65 and up stay hospitalized longer than those aged 65 or under—yet the seniors ring up significantly smaller bills per stay. The bad news is that the “savings” likely come in the form of fewer percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs, aka angioplasties) to open blocked heart arteries nonsurgically.

Rare protein-truncating variants in the apolipoprotein B (APOB) gene are linked to lower triglycerides and LDL cholesterol levels and also appear to be protective against coronary heart disease (CHD), according to a study published in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine.

Once the artery has been opened with PCI, the treatment involves mixing a patient’s own blood with oxygenated saline and then infusing that superoxygenated mixture to the targeted ischemic area for 60 minutes.

The promise of artificial intelligence to revolutionize healthcare is the topic of increasing research, with new publications every day devoted to the topic. One of these applications, according to an April 1 article in The Wall Street Journal, is using AI to listen to a person’s voice and detect a range of mental and physical ailments, including coronary artery disease (CAD).

A woman who was on the hook for nearly $227,000 in medical bills after suffering a heart attack and other complications had her balance wiped out by a medical charity waiver, Kaiser Health News reported. But that didn’t save Debbie Moehnke and her husband, Larry, the stress of mounting medical bills and calls from debt collectors, and the story highlights how inconsistent billing practices could impact other patients.

NEW ORLEANS — An antithrombotic regimen of apixaban plus a P2Y12 inhibitor such as clopidogrel lowered bleeding events and hospitalizations compared to warfarin plus clopidogrel in a cohort of patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) and a recent acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to results of the AUGUSTUS trial.

NEW ORLEANS — Described by its authors as “a one-stop shop” for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease, a new guideline released March 17 by the American Heart Association (AHA) and the American College of Cardiology (ACC) runs the gamut from smoking cessation strategies to specific recommendations for treating cholesterol based on a patient’s 10-year risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease.

As people around the country struggle to catch up on sleep after “springing forward” an hour, a Washington Post story reminds us of the health risks associated with adjusting our clocks, including an increased incidence of heart attacks.

Both initial and serial increases in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) concentrations are independently predictive of cardiac events following acute coronary syndrome (ACS), according to a new study in JAMA Cardiology.

The proportion of heart attack patients who are 40 or younger has steadily increased over the last decade, according to research set to be presented March 17 at the American College of Cardiology’s scientific sessions in New Orleans.

Women are more likely to call ambulances for male relatives like brothers, sons and husbands with suspected MIs than they are to call an ambulance for themselves, according to research presented March 3 at the European Society of Cardiology’s Acute Cardiovascular Care 2019 congress in Malaga, Spain.

Delay to hospital presentation and suboptimal post-percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) TIMI flow grades are both independently associated with excess mortality in women who suffer ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), according to a study that sought to better define the disproportionate sex gap in STEMI mortality.