Magazine

As Cardiovascular Business enters its second decade, our team has been pondering what the magazine’s pre-teen and teen years will be like. Are we looking at dignified maturity or awkward adolescence? 

Cardiologists are receiving more exposure to different imaging modalities during their fellowships, but their job prospects and training vary widely. A more comprehensive and multimodality training approach could lead to better results.  

Concierge cardiologists report high job satisfaction along with more stable practice revenue, but experts caution specialists to learn about the differences in practice models.   

Understanding risks, policy costs and potential value can help you decide whether to invest in cyber-liability insurance.

Artificial intelligence (AI)–assisted electrophysiology (EP) shows promise, but even its most ardent advocates aren’t ready for full-fledged endorsement—yet.   

Ensuring mission and money in faculty compensation plans is a tall order for academic medical centers.

The healthcare delivery environment continues to evolve, requiring clinicians and practice executives to seek solutions that will lead to a pathway of success.

Patients want healthcare cost information, but price lists alone aren’t turning them into savvy shoppers.

Conversations about compensation are among the toughest for healthcare leaders to navigate. Add accusations of gender bias, and it’s a powder keg.

Cardiology fellow Haider Warraich, MD, hopes his book about death will change how we live.

After decades of steady progress pushing back the leading cause of death and disability, cardiologists are striving to achieve the Quadruple Aim as they prepare for a tidal wave of aging patients with multiple chronic conditions. Bellwether hospitals are rethinking old systems and carving out new pathways for managing “Chronic America.”

Ask cardiologists to name the big advances of the past decade, and many point to transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) and other breakthroughs that are allowing cardiologists to treat structural heart disease with minimally invasive procedures. Looking ahead, some believe that even bigger, broader changes are coming.

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