Magazine

It’s becoming evident that the Stark law is frustrating the move from volume to value. Experts expect changes that could allow health systems and practices to deploy better coordinated, team-based care and advanced alternative payment models.

Major cardiology associations joined forces to update the 2012 universal definition of myocardial infarction and standardize what constitutes a heart attack.

Machine learning tools will support physicians’ efforts to deliver better patient outcomes at lower costs.

Do you remember the anticipation around renal denervation? And then the ACC.14 presentation of the SYMPLICITY HTN-3 results, where the excitement about a new way to treat resistant hypertension seemed to crash?

Taking the time to build consensus and approaching the task strategically often makes the difference between success and failure. But strategy’s never a substitute for integrity.

Cardiovascular Business asked healthcare administrators for their favorite book recommendations. Here are a few of their responses.

Is practice variation a real problem or a passing trend? Which metrics matter? Are there practical approaches healthcare leaders should use to tackle variation and, if so, how can they get their teams on board? Cardiologists and administrators weigh in.

Is the 30-day readmissions metric for PCI fair or fatally flawed? The answer could have considerable financial, clinical and reputational impact for hospitals and physicians.

Despite limitations, hospital rankings have become an essential tool as clinicians and executives set goals for their institutions and strive to achieve them. And patients take notice, too.

When North Colorado Medical Center in Greeley set out to build a new hybrid OR equipped with robotic angiography, they had no idea the project would set a new bar for project planning and execution across the health system, bring “exponential improvements” in image quality and “exponential reductions” in radiation dose and contrast media, or that they’d finish the project almost a month early without a single change order and $600,000 under budget. Teamwork, meticulous planning and virtual reality-guidance played an essential role in refining and perfecting this image-guided surgery suite even before a pen was put to paper.

Patients are responsible for a growing portion of healthcare costs. In some cases, that responsibility has become untenable, leading patients to delay or avoid care, or to leave their providers with unpaid bills. In their search for solutions, hospitals and practices are trying a variety of interventions.

Look to behavioral science for new solutions that could reduce gender bias in medicine.

Select an Issues