Conferences

The addition of perivascular fat attenuation to routine coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) improves risk stratification in heart patients, according to research presented at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)’s annual symposium in Munich, surpassing current prognostic models to re-classify and predict cardiac deaths with more accuracy.

Patients with stable chest pain who were evaluated with coronary CT angiography (CTA) were significantly less likely to experience a heart attack or die from coronary heart disease (CHD) within five years compared to individuals who received standard testing, researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine.

The British Heart Foundation announced at this year’s ESC (European Society of Cardiology) Congress it’s launching the Big Beat Challenge, a research award that will throw £30 million—nearly $40 million—behind an innovation that could change the future of cardiovascular medicine.

Though it’s used routinely to discourage repeat cardiovascular disease (CVD) events, a daily dose of aspirin is unlikely to prevent a first-time heart attack, according to research presented this week in Munich.

For patients hospitalized with an acute illness, prescribing rivaroxaban for 45 days after discharge doesn’t significantly reduce the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) or VTE-related death, according to research presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress and published online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

For patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) complicated by cardiogenic shock, stenting only the culprit lesion showed a trend toward improved one-year survival when compared to multivessel PCI, according to the latest results of the CULPRIT-SHOCK trial presented at the European Society of Cardiology Congress in Munich.

More than 40 percent of patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) but no record of stroke or transient ischemic attack have previously unknown, “silent” brain damage, according to research presented this week at the European Society of Cardiology Congress (ESC) in Munich. The findings might explain why those with AFib also face an increased risk of cognitive dysfunction and dementia.

Numerous, deep forehead wrinkles could be a visual cue that a patient is more at risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to research presented Aug. 26 at the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress in Munich.

A protein known to protect brain function in the setting of Duchenne muscular dystrophy may also have a positive impact on the heart, according to preliminary research presented at the American Heart Association’s Basic Cardiovascular Sciences scientific sessions on Aug. 1 in San Antonio.

Having a multidisciplinary team available around-the-clock to meet patients with suspected emergent large vessel occlusion (ELVO) strokes helped a hospital achieve median door-to-recanalization times of 52 minutes, according to a study presented at the Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery’s annual meeting.

Patients were about 40 percent less likely to survive the most severe heart attacks in the six coldest months of the year, according to research presented in June at the British Cardiovascular Society Conference.

A deep-learning algorithm can automatically calculate left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with less variability than cardiologists, according to a study presented June 25 at the American Society of Echocardiography’s annual scientific sessions.