Conferences

An artificial intelligence “super brain” could help eliminate unnecessary diagnostic testing in patients who present with stable chest pain, according to a recent study, potentially saving physicians and patients significant time and money.

A machine learning algorithm can now predict death and MI more accurately than certified cardiologists, according to research presented at the International Conference on Nuclear Cardiology and Cardiac CT in Lisbon, Portugal, this May.

Clinical trials presented at ACC.19 flipped the script on TAVR vs. SAVR. 

Research presented at the Heart Rhythm Society’s 40th annual scientific sessions in San Francisco May 7 suggests heart patients with implanted electronic devices know less about their therapies than they think they do.

SCAI has diversified its planning committees and expanded the focus on live cases for its 2019 scientific sessions, says Program Chair Sunil Rao, MD.

The Heart Rhythm Society's 2019 scientific sessions will be held May 8-11 in San Francisco, a venue that enabled the program committee to tap into Silicon Valley’s expertise with digital health, emerging technology and innovation. HRS.19 Program Director Christine Albert, MD, MPH, gave Cardiovascular Business a preview of meeting highlights.

When couples attended smoking cessation programs together, their odds of quitting were nearly six times higher than for people who attempted to kick the habit alone, according to preliminary research presented April 12 at EuroPrevent 2019.

A study of nearly 900,000 patients with heart failure or cardiogenic shock revealed their race, insurance coverage and ZIP code were associated with their odds of receiving a left ventricular assist device (LVAD).

Counties in states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) had fewer deaths from cardiovascular disease than those in states that didn’t expand Medicaid, according to an abstract presented April 5 at the American Heart Association’s Quality of Care and Outcomes Research scientific sessions.

People who reported waking up in the middle of the night to use the bathroom were 40 percent more likely to have hypertension, according to a study presented March 30 at the Japanese Circulation Society’s annual scientific meeting.

In the largest-ever randomized trial of antihypertensive drug treatment in sub-Saharan Africa, two medication combinations including the long-acting calcium channel blocker amlodipine outperformed a third two-drug combination featuring a diuretic and an angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor.

Hypertensive patients from the RADIANCE-HTN SOLO trial who received renal denervation sustained a lower blood pressure through six months compared to participants randomized to a sham procedure, despite being placed on fewer antihypertensive medications during follow-up.