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Vascular & Endovascular

 

High cholesterol and obesity can increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, but new research poses another, more surprising risk factor: Depression.

Between 1990 and 2015, the rate of systolic blood pressure of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg and of 140 mm Hg or higher significantly increased, according to an analysis from 195 countries and territories.

A population-based cohort study in Sweden found there was no association between cannabis use in young adulthood and early stroke. However, there was an association between cigarette smoking and early stroke.

Approximately 800,000 adults suffer a stroke each year, making the condition a leading cause of death in the U.S. Research has shown that patients benefit from adhering to their medications and reducing risk factors such as smoking and obesity. A recent study suggests they may also survive longer after a stroke if they remain married.

Married adults had a significantly lower risk of death following a stroke compared with those who were never married, remarried or widowed, according to an analysis of an ongoing observational, prospective cohort study.

 

Recent Headlines

Neonatal hemorrhagic strokes may occur more often than previously thought

A population-based, case-control study in Canada found that neonatal hemorrhagic stroke occurred in at least one of every 6,300 live births. That incidence rate was higher than previously reported.

Interventional cardiology, peripheral vascular devices market expected to reach $31.5 billion in 2021

The global interventional cardiology and peripheral vascular devices market is expected to reach $31.47 billion in 2021, an increase from $21.83 billion in 2016, according to a new report from Research and Markets.

Depression could be as bad for the heart as obesity, cholesterol

High cholesterol and obesity can increase the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases, but new research poses another, more surprising risk factor: Depression.

Hypertension later in life could protect against dementia

A new study published today by researchers at the University of California, Irvine found that the onset of high blood pressure later in life could be associated with lower dementia risk after the age of 90.

Schizophrenic patients could face increased risk for diabetes

New research from London has suggested that people suffering from early schizophrenia could be at an increased risk of developing diabetes.

Youth obesity, type 2 diabetes diagnoses increase, according to insurance data

It appears as though diabetes in children could be on the rise, according to a new white paper on insurance claims that found the number of children being diagnosed with the disease has more than doubled.

Ethanol stoves safer for cardiovascular health in pregnant women

Biomass and kerosene cook stoves are not too familiar to the everyday American, but in developing countries, they are usually the only types of stove appliance residents have access to. Unfortunately, they can have harmful effects on the user’s cardiovascular health, particularly that of pregnant women, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Chicago.

Mother’s blood pressure could affect sex of her baby, study suggests

Blood pressure affects many functions in the bodyand a new study has just discovered another one, one that could determine the sex of a child.

Elevated systolic blood pressure, hypertension increase worldwide in last 25 years

Between 1990 and 2015, the rate of systolic blood pressure of at least 110 to 115 mm Hg and of 140 mm Hg or higher significantly increased, according to an analysis from 195 countries and territories.

Study finds link between insufficient sleep, gestational diabetes in pregnant women

In the first study to examine the relationship between sleep duration and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a multi-ethnic Asian population, researchers found insufficient sleep during pregnancy could lead to the development of GDM.

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