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Structural Heart

 

A patient’s socioeconomic status as a child may not be found in any chart—but a recent study showed how it can impact development of the heart. Researchers found that childhood socioeconomic inequalities lead to differences in left ventricular mass and diastolic function in adulthood.

New research suggests that small health improvements, like not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight, are associated with a lower risk of hypertension among black patients, compared to those that don't practice a healthy lifestyle.

We cut a finger and the skin heals. But what if hearts could heal too? Researchers recently found a molecule in newborns that might help, some day. The team at the Weizmann Institute of Science have identified a molecule found in newborns that appears to control the renewal process, assisting regeneration in damaged hearts.

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have uncovered a molecule found in newborns that aids in regenerating damaged hearts—and are now testing ways that the molecule could treat heart attack victims.

Researchers from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, announced new findings that suggest smaller doses of a few blood pressure medications could be just as effective as standard doses of just one.

 

Recent Headlines

Economic inequalities lead to disparities in cardiovascular disease rates

A patient’s socioeconomic status as a child may not be found in any chart—but a recent study showed how it can impact development of the heart. Researchers found that childhood socioeconomic inequalities lead to differences in left ventricular mass and diastolic function in adulthood.

Healthy lifestyle reduces hypertension in black Americans

New research suggests that small health improvements, like not smoking and maintaining a healthy weight, are associated with a lower risk of hypertension among black patients, compared to those that don't practice a healthy lifestyle.

Healing hearts, one molecule at a time

We cut a finger and the skin heals. But what if hearts could heal too? Researchers recently found a molecule in newborns that might help, some day. The team at the Weizmann Institute of Science have identified a molecule found in newborns that appears to control the renewal process, assisting regeneration in damaged hearts.

Scientists ID cell that can regenerate heart tissue after MI

Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel have uncovered a molecule found in newborns that aids in regenerating damaged hearts—and are now testing ways that the molecule could treat heart attack victims.

Combining smaller doses of hypertension meds could be more effective than the standard

Researchers from the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, announced new findings that suggest smaller doses of a few blood pressure medications could be just as effective as standard doses of just one.

Amgen seeks market approval for Repatha in U.S., Europe

Thousand Oaks, California-based Amgen has submitted a supplemental Biologics License Application to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and a variation of one in Europe seeking approval for Repatha, a PCSK9 inhibitor.

Liver disease more prominent in Fontan surgery patients, research shows

New research from the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia shows patients who have undergone the Fontan operation as children are at an increased risk for developing progressive liver fibrosis.

Chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy hits men harder than women

A small study examining how chemotherapy-induced cardiomyopathy found that men experienced greater side effects, including significantly lower left and right ventricular ejection.

New research clarifies why we think moderate drinking is heart healthy

We’ve all heard that a glass of wine could be good for your heart, but new evidence from research at the University of Victoria in British Columbia, Canada, says otherwise.

Linking high volume to better outcomes in TAVR

If you want something done well, ask a busy person. That was one of my dad’s adages over the years. The same is true in healthcare, as many studies have found that volume—busy-ness—and quality in medicine go hand in hand.

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