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Prevention

 

Because the number of hospital visits and deaths related to consuming energy drinks has increased in recent years, researchers looked at how they affect the heart and blood pressure—and the findings may make physicians think differently.

New research from the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) has found that by examining the health of peripheral arteries, providers could better predict the risk of patients developing ischemic cardiovascular disease.

Experiencing hot flashes during menopause isn’t just uncomfortable, it could also be a sign of emerging vascular dysfunction and heart disease in women aged 40-53, new research shows.

Between 2007 and 2011, New York state implemented trans-fatty acid (TFA) restrictions in 11 counties to help improve residents’ health. New research is showing that it did just that—and had an especially significant impact on lowering the number of hospitalizations related to cardiovascular events.

A new survey organized by the American Heart Association (AHA) found that only half of Americans would be willing to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in an emergency because of fears that they wouldn’t do it correctly.

 

Recent Headlines

Research links energy drinks to abnormal heart activity, high blood pressure

Because the number of hospital visits and deaths related to consuming energy drinks has increased in recent years, researchers looked at how they affect the heart and blood pressure—and the findings may make physicians think differently.

Researchers find simpler way to link atherosclerosis to heart disease

New research from the New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYITCOM) has found that by examining the health of peripheral arteries, providers could better predict the risk of patients developing ischemic cardiovascular disease.

Menopausal hot flashes linked to increased heart disease risk

Experiencing hot flashes during menopause isn’t just uncomfortable, it could also be a sign of emerging vascular dysfunction and heart disease in women aged 40-53, new research shows.

Vitamin B could protect against air pollution-induced heart disease

Taking vitamin B supplements could be one way to protect yourself from air pollution, a new study finds.

Restrictions on trans-fatty acids associated with fewer hospitalizations

Between 2007 and 2011, New York state implemented trans-fatty acid (TFA) restrictions in 11 counties to help improve residents’ health. New research is showing that it did just that—and had an especially significant impact on lowering the number of hospitalizations related to cardiovascular events.

Survey finds many Americans afraid to perform CPR

A new survey organized by the American Heart Association (AHA) found that only half of Americans would be willing to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in an emergency because of fears that they wouldn’t do it correctly.

Study: Improved access to preventative care can reduce heart attacks, strokes

Improved access to preventive healthcare resources can help patients guard against developing cardiovascular conditions—a finding in a new study that helps makes the case for comprehensive healthcare expansion.

One in five with high blood pressure adhere to medication regimens

New research from the Netherlands suggests patients with high blood pressure who actually take their prescribed medications are few and far between, a surprising reality that can be dangerous and deadly for high-risk patients. 

Lazy lifestyle more harmful to heart than obesity, research suggests

Though obesity can have an impact on the risk of an individual developing cardiovascular disease, a sedentary lifestyle could be even more harmful to middle-aged and elderly people, according to new research from the Netherlands.

Australian women less likely to be screened for heart disease

New research from Australia has shed light on a gender disparity when it comes to being screened for cardiovascular disease. 

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