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Practice Management

 

People with HIV and risk factors for heart disease and stroke are less likely to receive prescriptions for statins and aspirin than those without HIV, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

During the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, Michael J. Rinaldi, MD, showed a survey of 92 health systems in which 52 percent reported an average negative margin on TAVR procedures. In an hour-long session, Rinaldi and other experts agreed shortening hospital stays and reducing the number of days spent in the intensive care unit (ICU) are key aspects in making TAVR more profitable for hospitals.

Interventional cardiologists are exposed to chronic low-dose radiation, which can lead to adverse health conditions. At a Nov. 1 presentation at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium in Denver, Wieneke Vlastra, MD, reported a 20 percent decrease in radiation exposure for operators when a lead-free disposable pad was placed on the patient.

William Oetgen, MD, MBA, has been elected chairman of the MedStar Health Board of Directors, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) announced in a release today. He will serve a two-year term.

When Robert Hromas, MD, MS, began working at University of Florida Health seven years ago, he heard a gripe that is likely echoed in academic medical centers across the country.

 

Recent Headlines

HIV patients less likely to be prescribed aspirin, statins despite increased cardiovascular risk

People with HIV and risk factors for heart disease and stroke are less likely to receive prescriptions for statins and aspirin than those without HIV, according to a study in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

TCT 2017: Physicians explore economic merits of minimalist approach to TAVR, ‘prehab’ programs

During the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium, Michael J. Rinaldi, MD, showed a survey of 92 health systems in which 52 percent reported an average negative margin on TAVR procedures. In an hour-long session, Rinaldi and other experts agreed shortening hospital stays and reducing the number of days spent in the intensive care unit (ICU) are key aspects in making TAVR more profitable for hospitals.

TCT 2017: Cath lab radiation down 20% when lead-free pad placed on patient

Interventional cardiologists are exposed to chronic low-dose radiation, which can lead to adverse health conditions. At a Nov. 1 presentation at the Transcatheter Cardiovascular Therapeutics (TCT) scientific symposium in Denver, Wieneke Vlastra, MD, reported a 20 percent decrease in radiation exposure for operators when a lead-free disposable pad was placed on the patient.

ACC's William Oetgen elected chair of MedStar Health Board of Directors

William Oetgen, MD, MBA, has been elected chairman of the MedStar Health Board of Directors, the American College of Cardiology (ACC) announced in a release today. He will serve a two-year term.

Chronic America: Heart Teams Reinvent Old Systems to Improve Outcomes, Cut Costs 

After decades of steady progress pushing back the leading cause of death and disability, cardiologists are striving to achieve the Quadruple Aim as they prepare for a tidal wave of aging patients with multiple chronic conditions. Bellwether hospitals are rethinking old systems and carving out new pathways for managing “Chronic America.”

Case study examines how to incorporate academic missions into a compensation plan

When Robert Hromas, MD, MS, began working at University of Florida Health seven years ago, he heard a gripe that is likely echoed in academic medical centers across the country.

Physician Burnout: Going from Taboo to Treatable

Physician burnout has been called a “silent epidemic” that not only overwhelms physicians but can impact the care they deliver to patients. A number of programs are starting to confront the problem head on—giving doctors hope that someone is listening.

Game Brain: To Win at Healthcare, Think Like a Gamer

The game has changed, the rules are evolving and winning has been redefined. Adopt a gaming mindset to get to the next level.

What is the one pharmaceutical, device or other technology in the pipeline today that you are most eager for, and why?

The recently reported CANTOS trial represents an enormously important development in cardiovascular medicine. For the first time, an anti-inflammatory drug (canakinumab) given by injection every three months has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Trial entry criteria required a hsCRP level >2 mg/L and stable coronary heart disease. The 150-mg dose reduced the risk of nonfatal myocardial infarction, stroke and cardiovascular death by 15 percent with no effect on lipids. These benefits were observed in patients already treated with the best available therapies, including high-dose statins and antiplatelet drugs. The importance of these findings extends far beyond the CANTOS trial. Now that we know that treating inflammation can reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, the search for other anti-inflammatory regimens can proceed with the high likelihood of successful clinical trials.

What has been the biggest transformative change in cardiology since 2007, and why?

This has been such an exciting time in cardiology—although the lens we use is often cloudy. Why? Because the pace of change is truly unparalleled. From massive changes in the physician fee schedule resulting in a rapid migration to employment to a total transformation in cardiovascular care delivery models, our practices are not what they were a decade ago. Cardiovascular service lines, dyad leadership and payment for quality and patient outcomes were unheard of in 2007. Yet I find our world invigorating and inspiring. We have successfully reduced mortality related to cardiac events!

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