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A new study from researchers at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom has shown a treatment gap in certain patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib), a finding that concerns healthcare providers because the condition is associated with a five-fold increase in stroke risk.

New research from the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom suggests that one in three people with high blood pressure fail to take their prescribed medications.

New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has shown that the aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension can reduce their chances of developing left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). 

In a new study that included more than 76,000 patients, researchers from Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that the chance of developing dementia increases when the start of anticoagulation treatment is delayed for atrial fibrillation (AFib).

While atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart disease continue to plague patients globally, some cardiologists have made it their mission to help underserved communities in foreign countries as they look for ways to use their specialties for good.

 

Recent Headlines

Northwell Health ranks high among New York providers in cardiac surgery outcome data

Long Island Jewish Medical Center in New Hyde Park, New York, and North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, both Northwell Health providers, have been ranked as facilities with the best outcomes for patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) in the state, according to recent Department of Health (DOH) reports.

Treatment disparities growing among AFib patients

A new study from researchers at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom has shown a treatment gap in certain patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib), a finding that concerns healthcare providers because the condition is associated with a five-fold increase in stroke risk.

Researchers in the U.K. develop urine test to measure patients’ adherence to hypertension meds

New research from the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom suggests that one in three people with high blood pressure fail to take their prescribed medications.

Lowering blood pressure in hypertensive patients can reduce chance of ventricular hypertrophy

New research from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, has shown that the aggressive lowering of blood pressure in people with hypertension can reduce their chances of developing left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). 

Edwards Lifesciences’ philanthropy project estimated to impact 1 million people by 2020

Through a charity initiative, Edwards Lifesciences, a cardiac equipment company in Irvine, California, reports that it has been able to serve more than 400,000 underserved people as it works to treat and prevent heart valve disease.

HRS2017: Delayed use of anticoagulants could increase dementia risk

In a new study that included more than 76,000 patients, researchers from Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that the chance of developing dementia increases when the start of anticoagulation treatment is delayed for atrial fibrillation (AFib).

SCAI 2017: Race, gender, socioeconomic status impact PCI outcomes

New research revealed at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) meeting in New Orleans last week showed that being a white man could yield better outcomes when it comes to undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent.

HRS2017: How pro bono work can turn ordinary cardiologists into global citizens

While atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart disease continue to plague patients globally, some cardiologists have made it their mission to help underserved communities in foreign countries as they look for ways to use their specialties for good.

Atrial fibrillation, flutter could be more deadly for women

New research out of Canada points to a trend showing atrial fibrillation and flutter (AFF) kills more women than men.

Heart failure could be as deadly as cancer

A new study from Europe evaluated whether survival rates for patients with heart failure are better than those with common cancers—and the results were comparable.

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