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New research looking at the efficacy of rivaroxaban, an oral blood-thinning medication compared to aspirin yielded positive results for the complex drug, showing that it can limit the recurrence of a venous thromboembolism (VTE) without increasing the risk for bleeding.

Inclisiran, a PCSK9 synthesis inhibitor designed to lower cholesterol levels in the blood, was shown to significantly lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) while maintaining standards of safety and tolerability for every single patient in a clinical trial, a triumph in treatment for cardiovascular disease caused by high cholesterol. 

Stroke experts gathered at the International Stroke Conference in Houston Feb. 23 to discuss how many parts of the world have limited access to technologies and treatments for stroke.

New research from Columbia University shows that patients who are hospitalized or treated in an emergency room for depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health conditions may have an increased risk for stroke.

New research has revealed that middle aged people with heart disease risks are more likely to develop dementia later in life.

 

Recent Headlines

ACC.17: Rivaroxaban more effective in preventing VTE recurrence than aspirin, EINSTEIN CHOICE study shows

New research looking at the efficacy of rivaroxaban, an oral blood-thinning medication compared to aspirin yielded positive results for the complex drug, showing that it can limit the recurrence of a venous thromboembolism (VTE) without increasing the risk for bleeding.

ACC.17: ORION-1 trial provides encouraging results on cholesterol-lowering inhibitor

Inclisiran, a PCSK9 synthesis inhibitor designed to lower cholesterol levels in the blood, was shown to significantly lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) while maintaining standards of safety and tolerability for every single patient in a clinical trial, a triumph in treatment for cardiovascular disease caused by high cholesterol. 

Rubschlager family donates $2 million to AHA research

Paul and Joan Rubschlager, owners of Rubschlager Baking in Chicago, have donated $2 million to their family precision promise fund, which will support initiatives spearheaded by the American Heart Association (AHA).

Access to stroke care, treatment is limited for 90% of world's population

Stroke experts gathered at the International Stroke Conference in Houston Feb. 23 to discuss how many parts of the world have limited access to technologies and treatments for stroke.

Columbia researchers find patients hospitalized for mental health conditions at higher risk for stroke

New research from Columbia University shows that patients who are hospitalized or treated in an emergency room for depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental health conditions may have an increased risk for stroke.

Dementia linked to heart disease in middle-aged people

New research has revealed that middle aged people with heart disease risks are more likely to develop dementia later in life.

Black women with heart disease risk face higher rates of loneliness than whites

A study presented Feb. 21 at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference found that black women who are at risk for heart disease tend to struggle with loneliness more than white women.

University of Michigan: Text reminders help hypertensive patients adhere to medication regimens

In a new study, researchers at the University of Michigan have found that text messaging is a useful and inexpensive method to help hypertensive patients adhere to medication regimens on time.

German research: All heart surgery patients may face risk of retained blood syndrome

Though it has long been believed that only high-risk patients are susceptible to developing retained blood syndrome after heart surgery, new research from Germany suggests all heart surgery patients can be at risk of developing the condition.

Southerners, blacks more likely to die from heart disease

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reveals that residents of the Southern U.S., particularly black ones, are more likely to die of heart problems than any other disease.

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