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In a new study that included more than 76,000 patients, researchers from Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that the chance of developing dementia increases when the start of anticoagulation treatment is delayed for atrial fibrillation (AFib).

While atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart disease continue to plague patients globally, some cardiologists have made it their mission to help underserved communities in foreign countries as they look for ways to use their specialties for good.

New research out of Canada points to a trend showing atrial fibrillation and flutter (AFF) kills more women than men.

A new study from Europe evaluated whether survival rates for patients with heart failure are better than those with common cancers—and the results were comparable.

A new study from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center suggests that teenagers who consume too much salt experience significant changes in their blood vessels that predispose them to cardiovascular disease later in life.

 

Recent Headlines

Edwards Lifesciences’ philanthropy project estimated to impact 1 million people by 2020

Through a charity initiative, Edwards Lifesciences, a cardiac equipment company in Irvine, California, reports that it has been able to serve more than 400,000 underserved people as it works to treat and prevent heart valve disease.

HRS2017: Delayed use of anticoagulants could increase dementia risk

In a new study that included more than 76,000 patients, researchers from Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City found that the chance of developing dementia increases when the start of anticoagulation treatment is delayed for atrial fibrillation (AFib).

SCAI 2017: Race, gender, socioeconomic status impact PCI outcomes

New research revealed at the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI) meeting in New Orleans last week showed that being a white man could yield better outcomes when it comes to undergoing a percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a drug-eluting stent.

HRS2017: How pro bono work can turn ordinary cardiologists into global citizens

While atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart disease continue to plague patients globally, some cardiologists have made it their mission to help underserved communities in foreign countries as they look for ways to use their specialties for good.

Atrial fibrillation, flutter could be more deadly for women

New research out of Canada points to a trend showing atrial fibrillation and flutter (AFF) kills more women than men.

Heart failure could be as deadly as cancer

A new study from Europe evaluated whether survival rates for patients with heart failure are better than those with common cancers—and the results were comparable.

Too much salt can lead to arterial stiffness in adolescents

A new study from the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center suggests that teenagers who consume too much salt experience significant changes in their blood vessels that predispose them to cardiovascular disease later in life.

Michigan cardiology partnership celebrates 20 years

A Blue Cross Blue Shield cardiology collaborative in Michigan, designed to improve care and outcomes for heart patients, is celebrating two decades of existence.

Medicare program doesn’t accurately calibrate heart attack mortality rates

A Medicare portal that shows the statistical methodology used to rate and compare hospitals may not be accurate when it comes to estimating the mortality rate of patients suffering from acute MI (AMI) at smaller hospitals, according to a new study.

Mexican-Americans receive fewer post-stroke rehab services

New research studying stroke rehabilitation has found that Mexican-Americans disproportionately receive fewer rehab services after a stroke compared to their white counterparts, a finding that could explain why Mexican-Americans tend to suffer more from long-term stroke effects.

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