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Lipids & Metabolic

 

Soda taxes have recently been implemented by several U.S. cities as a way to generate revenue while curbing sugary beverage consumption, a driver of the nation’s obesity epidemic. But it turns out Americans were already reaching for a bottle of ‘pop’ less often.

'Tis the season for sampling pumpkin pies and gorging on turkey leftovers, but diners might want to slow down this holiday season if they want to stay healthy, Japanese researchers reported at this year's American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Anaheim, California. 

The more traumatic events a woman experiences during her lifetime, the more likely she is to become obese, researchers reported at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions this week.

People with high triglycerides, even in the presence of controlled low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), remain at increased risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and incur higher healthcare costs, according to a retrospective data analysis presented Nov. 12 at the American Heart Association scientific sessions in Anaheim, California.

Lifestyle modification (LSM) and medication can prevent people at risk of diabetes from developing the condition in the short term, but only LSM is associated with a sustained risk reduction, according to a meta-analysis published Nov. 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

 

Recent Headlines

Americans drinking less soda, reducing caloric intake from drinks

Soda taxes have recently been implemented by several U.S. cities as a way to generate revenue while curbing sugary beverage consumption, a driver of the nation’s obesity epidemic. But it turns out Americans were already reaching for a bottle of ‘pop’ less often.

Fast eaters 11.6% more likely to develop metabolic syndrome

'Tis the season for sampling pumpkin pies and gorging on turkey leftovers, but diners might want to slow down this holiday season if they want to stay healthy, Japanese researchers reported at this year's American Heart Association Scientific Sessions in Anaheim, California. 

Stressed women more likely to develop obesity

The more traumatic events a woman experiences during her lifetime, the more likely she is to become obese, researchers reported at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions this week.

High triglycerides—despite LDL-C control—associated with adverse events, higher healthcare costs

People with high triglycerides, even in the presence of controlled low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), remain at increased risk for major adverse cardiac events (MACE) and incur higher healthcare costs, according to a retrospective data analysis presented Nov. 12 at the American Heart Association scientific sessions in Anaheim, California.

Lifestyle changes—not medications—linked to sustained risk reduction for diabetes

Lifestyle modification (LSM) and medication can prevent people at risk of diabetes from developing the condition in the short term, but only LSM is associated with a sustained risk reduction, according to a meta-analysis published Nov. 6 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Late-night snacking could raise risk of diabetes, CVD

Eating at night disrupts the body’s natural clock, encourages fat buildup and could increase a person’s risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, research published this week in Experimental Physiology states.

Danish researchers discover how to convert progenitor cells into beta cells

Human stem cells can now effectively be specialized to create functioning beta cells, a discovery that could greatly aid diabetics struggling with insulin shortages, according to new research published in Nature Cell Biology.

‘Nothing ever follows through’: Antimalarial drug disappoints in treatment of diabetes

Recent research following a finding from earlier this year that antimalarial drug artemether could aid treatment of type 1 diabetes has resulted in disappointment, Mark Huising, PhD, and colleagues reported in a study published this month in Cell Metabolism.

Survey exposes perception gaps between patients, providers for managing obesity

A recent survey revealed that only half of obese people view themselves as obese, while 28 percent of health care providers (HCPs) don’t believe it is their job to contribute to patients’ weight-loss efforts.

Despite government efforts, LDL cholesterol remains uncontrolled among uninsured Americans

Despite increased healthcare outreach, an uptick in publicly and privately insured Americans and an effort to clear socioeconomic hurdles, U.S. rates of uncontrolled low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) aren’t improving in uninsured populations, according to recent research published in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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