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Imaging

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Feb. 8 announced the approval of the RadioGenix System, which may help stabilize the United States’ supply of a radioisotope crucial for medical imaging.

Low-calorie “crash” diets actually cause a heart to become fatter in the short term, impairing its function, researchers reported at CMR 2018.

Seven new commercial payers are covering the use of the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, a noninvasive technology that allows clinicians to view a simulated, three-dimensional model of a patient’s coronary blood flow. More than 185 million patients will now have access to HeartFlow, the company announced Feb. 1.

Using multimodality imaging to assess Fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) activity could help clinicians better predict whether abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are likely to grow more rapidly and eventually rupture, researchers reported in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) announced Jan. 29 its ImageGuideEcho registry is open to U.S. physicians. ImageGuideEcho is the first registry exclusively devoted to measuring quality in cardiovascular ultrasounds.

 

Recent Headlines

FDA paves way for domestic creation of No. 1 imaging radioisotope

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) on Feb. 8 announced the approval of the RadioGenix System, which may help stabilize the United States’ supply of a radioisotope crucial for medical imaging.

MRI shows crash diets temporarily hamper heart function

Low-calorie “crash” diets actually cause a heart to become fatter in the short term, impairing its function, researchers reported at CMR 2018.

7 more payers to cover noninvasive test for coronary artery disease

Seven new commercial payers are covering the use of the HeartFlow FFRct Analysis, a noninvasive technology that allows clinicians to view a simulated, three-dimensional model of a patient’s coronary blood flow. More than 185 million patients will now have access to HeartFlow, the company announced Feb. 1.

Researchers propose new method for predicting AAA growth, rupture

Using multimodality imaging to assess Fluorine-18-sodium fluoride (18F-NaF) activity could help clinicians better predict whether abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are likely to grow more rapidly and eventually rupture, researchers reported in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

New registry aims to improve quality of cardiovascular imaging

The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) announced Jan. 29 its ImageGuideEcho registry is open to U.S. physicians. ImageGuideEcho is the first registry exclusively devoted to measuring quality in cardiovascular ultrasounds.

Whole-body imaging links heart, brain inflammation after MI

A new study using whole-body molecular imaging identified a shared inflammatory response between the cardiovascular and central nervous systems following myocardial infarction (MI), possibly adding insight to the reported connection between cardiac injury and cognitive decline.

Seeing the Big Picture: Training Today’s Imagers to ‘Think Multimodality’

Cardiologists are receiving more exposure to different imaging modalities during their fellowships, but their job prospects and training vary widely. A more comprehensive and multimodality training approach could lead to better results.  

Carotid ultrasound may improve CVD risk assessment in patients with inflammatory skin condition

Carotid ultrasound improves the cardiovascular risk stratification of individuals with the skin condition hidradenitis suppurativa (HS), according to a study published Jan. 4 in PLOS One.

Advanced MRI detects placental abnormalities early in CHD-affected pregnancies

Specialized imaging technology known as velocity-selective arterial spin labeling (VSASL) could detect placental abnormalities in fetuses affected by congenital heart disease (CHD) before they become irreversible, a Children’s National Health System research team has announced.

Coronary angiography beneficial for shockable, non-shockable cardiac rhythms

Despite being rarely performed in patients with non-shockable cardiac rhythms, coronary angiography led to a substantial survival benefit with a favorable neurological outcome, according to a study in PLOS One.

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