You are here

Heart Failure

 

The FDA has expanded its premarket approval for Impella heart pumps to include treatment for heart failure associated with cardiomyopathy leading to cardiogenic shock, device manufacturer Abiomed announced Feb. 13.

Exposure to noise pollution has been shown to negatively impact cardiovascular health. But researchers have only recently begun to explore exactly how noise can harm health. A study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology explored the connection between noise and arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke.

Aspirin is ineffective in preventing heart attack, stroke and death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation (AFib), according to a nationwide study in Denmark. In fact, patients on aspirin may be more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) or be rehospitalized for heart failure, Christian Madelaire, MD, and colleagues reported in JACC: Heart Failure.

Certain breast cancer therapies, including popular HER-2 targeted treatments, could be harmful to the heart in patients already at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the American Heart Association reported this week in a new scientific statement.

Only 30 percent of Medicare patients who received ventricular assist devices (VADs) in 2014 attended cardiac rehabilitation, but those patients enjoyed significant decreases in hospitalizations and mortality over the following year, according to a study in JACC: Heart Failure.

 

Recent Headlines

FDA expands approval for Impella heart pumps

The FDA has expanded its premarket approval for Impella heart pumps to include treatment for heart failure associated with cardiomyopathy leading to cardiogenic shock, device manufacturer Abiomed announced Feb. 13.

Heart & hearing: Noise pollution tied to higher risk of stroke, MI

Exposure to noise pollution has been shown to negatively impact cardiovascular health. But researchers have only recently begun to explore exactly how noise can harm health. A study published online Feb. 6 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology explored the connection between noise and arterial hypertension, myocardial infarction, heart failure and stroke.

Aspirin deemed worthless for heart failure patients without AFib

Aspirin is ineffective in preventing heart attack, stroke and death in heart failure patients without atrial fibrillation (AFib), according to a nationwide study in Denmark. In fact, patients on aspirin may be more likely to have myocardial infarction (MI) or be rehospitalized for heart failure, Christian Madelaire, MD, and colleagues reported in JACC: Heart Failure.

AHA: Breast cancer treatments could raise risk of CVD

Certain breast cancer therapies, including popular HER-2 targeted treatments, could be harmful to the heart in patients already at an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), the American Heart Association reported this week in a new scientific statement.

Cardiac rehab after VAD implantation rare—but effective

Only 30 percent of Medicare patients who received ventricular assist devices (VADs) in 2014 attended cardiac rehabilitation, but those patients enjoyed significant decreases in hospitalizations and mortality over the following year, according to a study in JACC: Heart Failure.

Guideline adherence—not patient volume—linked to better heart failure care

A new analysis in Circulation suggests low-volume centers that follow clinical guidelines are able to provide the same level of care in treating heart failure as higher-volume centers.

Wearable patch successfully assesses patients' heart failure status

A wearable patch with the ability to track cardiac activity can assess patients’ heart failure status, researchers reported in Circulation: Heart Failure this week.

Adult heart disease could stem from fetal infections

Heart disease in adults could be a result of fetal infection and inflammation before birth, especially if a baby is born prematurely, researchers from the University of Washington School of Medicine reported this week.

Researchers ID risk of heart failure subtypes by gender, race

Men are more prone to develop heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) than women but both sexes are equally likely to have heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), according to research published Jan. 19 in Circulation.

Moms face increased risk of HF for 6 weeks post-delivery

A six-week period following delivery poses the greatest threat to a new mom’s heart health, according to a study published this month in Circulation—it’s during these 42 days postpartum that a woman appears most susceptible to heart failure.

Pages