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Heart Failure

 

While 71 percent of heart patients are prescribed statins after hospitalization for heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease, just 37.4 percent retain that medication regimen a year later, researchers in Salt Lake City reported this week.

Patients who suffer brain damage after cardiac arrest could benefit from magnetic resonance (MR) imaging following their stabilization—a measure that has been shown to predict clinical outcomes through mapping brain activity, according to new research published in the American journal Radiology.

Ventricular assist devices (VADs) foster improved survival for children awaiting heart transplantation when compared to the current standard of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), according to a new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

African Americans are dying an average of 3.4 years before white Americans, a significant gap that’s attributable to more prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk factors in the black population, the American Heart Association (AHA) reported in a scientific statement published Monday in Circulation.

Cardiovascular research has traditionally focused on hard clinical endpoints such as markers of disease progression, adverse events and death. But now researchers are calling for more studies that incorporate the viewpoints of patients and caregivers, both in trial design and execution and in measuring outcomes like quality of life, time off work, out-of-pocket expense and caregiver burden.

 

Recent Headlines

30% of heart patients still taking prescribed statins 3 years later

While 71 percent of heart patients are prescribed statins after hospitalization for heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and peripheral artery disease, just 37.4 percent retain that medication regimen a year later, researchers in Salt Lake City reported this week.

Novel discovery suggests MRIs after cardiac arrest could predict patient outcomes

Patients who suffer brain damage after cardiac arrest could benefit from magnetic resonance (MR) imaging following their stabilization—a measure that has been shown to predict clinical outcomes through mapping brain activity, according to new research published in the American journal Radiology.

AHA: Blacks living shorter lives due to CVD, stroke

African Americans are dying an average of 3.4 years before white Americans, a significant gap that’s attributable to more prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) and risk factors in the black population, the American Heart Association (AHA) reported in a scientific statement published Monday in Circulation.

Children awaiting heart transplant survive longer with VADs than ECMO

Ventricular assist devices (VADs) foster improved survival for children awaiting heart transplantation when compared to the current standard of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), according to a new study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Researchers call for more patient-centered designs, outcomes in cardiovascular trials

Cardiovascular research has traditionally focused on hard clinical endpoints such as markers of disease progression, adverse events and death. But now researchers are calling for more studies that incorporate the viewpoints of patients and caregivers, both in trial design and execution and in measuring outcomes like quality of life, time off work, out-of-pocket expense and caregiver burden.

Digital trackers help cardiac rehab patients boost activity on their own time

Digital tracking devices can motivate patients to increase their physical activity outside of structured cardiac rehabilitation, a new study suggests.

Cardiologists set to present new data at China congress

Chinese cardiologists will be presenting their latest data on cardiovascular disease at the 28th Great Wall International Congress of Cardiology this weekend.

Mitochondrial DNA could more accurately predict 10-year risk for heart failure

Analyzing mitochondrial DNA copy numbers (mtDNA-CN) in patients at risk for cardiovascular disease could help clinicians predict sudden cardiac death and heart failure in patients up to a decade before anything happens, a study published in JAMA: Cardiology reports.

Black women face double the risk of pregnancy-related heart failure

Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) strikes black women harder than other races, both in frequency and the ability to recover, according to a report published in JAMA Cardiology.

Tai chi shows potential as cardiac rehab exercise

Tai chi proved to be safe and enjoyable in a small study of patients who declined traditional cardiac rehabilitation, suggesting the Chinese martial art could be an alternative exercise option.

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