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Electrophysiology & Arrhythmia

 

For nearly 6,000 patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the use of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) showed no mortality benefit but a higher risk of subsequent hospitalizations after covariate adjustment, researchers reported in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Catheter ablation was associated with significantly fewer deaths and hospitalizations for worsening heart failure than medical therapy in a randomized trial of patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart failure.

A pair of researchers at Utah State University are aiming to revolutionize the world of digital monitoring with a new technology that can measure a person’s heartbeat using nothing more than a video camera and specialized software, the university announced Monday.

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients face higher odds for short-term cancer diagnoses but, depending on how long they've had AFib, the could face lower odds for cancer in the long run, a January study states.

Nearly half of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors struggle to rejoin the workforce and participate in society post-heart attack, a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes suggests.

 

Recent Headlines

ICDs linked to more hospitalizations for patients with heart failure, CKD

For nearly 6,000 patients with heart failure and chronic kidney disease (CKD), the use of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) showed no mortality benefit but a higher risk of subsequent hospitalizations after covariate adjustment, researchers reported in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Ablation reduces deaths, hospitalizations for patients with AFib, heart failure

Catheter ablation was associated with significantly fewer deaths and hospitalizations for worsening heart failure than medical therapy in a randomized trial of patients with atrial fibrillation (AFib) and heart failure.

Tech allows researchers to detect heart rate via webcam

A pair of researchers at Utah State University are aiming to revolutionize the world of digital monitoring with a new technology that can measure a person’s heartbeat using nothing more than a video camera and specialized software, the university announced Monday.

40% of cardiomyopathies stem from genetics

Four in ten cardiomyopathies are familial, suggesting an urgent need for more widespread genetic testing, a team of cardiologists reported in the European Heart Journal this week.

Longtime AFib patients see lower cancer risk

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients face higher odds for short-term cancer diagnoses but, depending on how long they've had AFib, the could face lower odds for cancer in the long run, a January study states.

OHCA survivors report restricted socialization, increased cognitive impairment post-arrest

Nearly half of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) survivors struggle to rejoin the workforce and participate in society post-heart attack, a study published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes suggests.

Asymptomatic AFib patients ‘may not receive adequate treatment'

Asymptomatic atrial fibrillation (AFib) patients could be at a heightened risk for cardiac complications, especially if the condition is paroxysmal, a study published in CHEST reports.

Smart Support: Artificial Intelligence Will Help, Not Replace, Electrophysiologists

Artificial intelligence (AI)–assisted electrophysiology (EP) shows promise, but even its most ardent advocates aren’t ready for full-fledged endorsement—yet.   

FDA alert: Zoll LifeVest 4000 may fail to deliver life-saving shocks

The FDA issued a safety alert Jan. 17 for the Zoll LifeVest 4000, saying the external, wearable cardioverter defibrillator may fail to treat potentially fatal arrhythmias if it displays a specific error message which, by itself, doesn’t signal urgency.

ICDs life-saving—but risky—for children with Brugada syndrome

Roughly 1 in 4 children with Brugada syndrome treated with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) received life-saving shock therapy in a single-center study of 35 patients published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. However, 20 percent experienced inappropriate shocks and another 14 percent had device-related complications, highlighting the challenging clinical decision-making in this high-risk group.

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