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Acute Coronary Syndrome

 

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide additional benefit to antiplatelet therapy following acute coronary syndrome (ACS)—but only for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—according to a meta-analysis in JAMA Cardiology.

A plasma test to determine the maximum density of a blood clot and how long it takes to break down could help identify heart attack patients at increased risk for cardiovascular death or another myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published Jan. 29 in the European Heart Journal.

Routine medical tests could be missing as many as two-thirds of heart attack diagnoses, researchers reported at CMR 2018, an annual conference dedicated to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Barcelona, Spain.

Omega-3 supplements may not protect a patient from heart disease or vascular events, according to a meta-analysis published in JAMA Cardiology.

The benefits of vitamin D aren’t limited to improving bone health and fighting disease—the “sunshine vitamin” has now been shown to help restore damage to heart patients’ cardiovascular systems, according to research published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine this week.

 

Recent Headlines

Meta-analysis: Combination of DOACs, antiplatelets only favorable for STEMI

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) provide additional benefit to antiplatelet therapy following acute coronary syndrome (ACS)—but only for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)—according to a meta-analysis in JAMA Cardiology.

Blood test after heart attack unveils another prognostic biomarker

A plasma test to determine the maximum density of a blood clot and how long it takes to break down could help identify heart attack patients at increased risk for cardiovascular death or another myocardial infarction (MI), according to a study published Jan. 29 in the European Heart Journal.

Meta-analysis finds omega-3 supplements provide little benefit

Omega-3 supplements may not protect a patient from heart disease or vascular events, according to a meta-analysis published in JAMA Cardiology.

Routine tests could be missing 2/3 of heart attack diagnoses

Routine medical tests could be missing as many as two-thirds of heart attack diagnoses, researchers reported at CMR 2018, an annual conference dedicated to cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in Barcelona, Spain.

High doses of vitamin D shown to restore cardiovascular system post-heart attack

The benefits of vitamin D aren’t limited to improving bone health and fighting disease—the “sunshine vitamin” has now been shown to help restore damage to heart patients’ cardiovascular systems, according to research published in the International Journal of Nanomedicine this week.

Changes in heart rate over time correlate with cardiovascular risk

Increases in heart rate over time signal a higher risk of cardiovascular disease and death, supporting the use of serial monitoring in clinical practice, researchers reported in JAMA Cardiology.

Fitness improves CVD risk across spectrum of coronary artery calcium scores

Regardless of a patient’s age or level of coronary artery calcification (CAC), each incremental improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) contributes to a lower risk of adverse cardiovascular events, researchers reported in Circulation.

Excessive sleepiness linked to increased risk of CVD, MI

Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS)—a commonality among heart patients and those with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB)—could be an independent predictor of adverse cardiovascular events and repeat myocardial infarction (MI), researchers reported this month in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

Women’s higher risk of death after MI explained by age, comorbidities

Women who present at a hospital with non-ST segment elevated MI (non-STEMI) are more likely to die than men, but they are also six years older on average and have a higher burden of comorbidities, researchers reported in Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions.

24% of ischemic CVD patients dead or rehospitalized within 6 months

Nearly a quarter of patients with chronic ischemic cardiovascular disease are either dead or rehospitalized within six months of their diagnosis, according to a Jan. 17 report published in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.

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