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The role of some cardiac device makers is evolving in the cath lab as they expand from selling products to providing services and solutions. It’s a trend that is likely to continue globally.

Nudged by necessity

About four years ago, Kevin F. Fox, MD, faced a predicament. His hospital system needed new equipment for catheterization labs but lacked the capital to buy it. As chief of cardiology at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust in London (U.K.), he and administrators weighed their options. They could lease equipment from a vendor, but over time that likely would be even more costly than buying. Going to the other extreme, they could negotiate with a third party to provide a cath lab and then send their patients there.

The U.K. health system was...

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