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Trimed Staff
 - road, split, pathway, two minds
BOSTON Despite recent studies that question the "inappropriate use" of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in primary prevention, the large OMNI registry, presented May 11 at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), found that patients who received ICD implants in a non-evidence based manner experienced similar therapeutic benefit and outcomes to those who received evidence-based treatments.
BOSTONIs anti-arrhythmic drug use in ventricular arrhythmia and device patients safe? While the drugs might be useful in some instances, clinicians should not forget about the risks, said Paul Dorian, MD, MSc, during a presentation May 10 at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS).
BOSTONWhile innovations within the healthcare industry remain electric, there is still unexplained variations in care patterns in the U.S., particularly for device implants. Cardiologist density and patient insurance type could be some of the culprits, Paul Heidenreich, MD, of Stanford University, Palo Alto, Calif., said, adding that more work needs to be done to figure out the reasons for these differentiations.
LAS VEGASThe late-breaking CATHETER DCM trial, presented May 10 at the 35th annual meeting of the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions (SCAI), showed some trends toward progress for bone marrow stem cells to improve heart function in some patients with progressive heart failure due to dilated cardiomyopathy. However, principal investigator Timothy D. Henry, MD, of the Minneapolis Heart Institute at Abbott Northwestern Hospital, explained the results in the context of cell therapy for multiple cardiac conditions.
BOSTONImplantation of the Watchman device (Boston Scientific) without a warfarin transition is safe and effective in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients with contraindications to even short-term oral anticoagulation, according to an analysis of the ASA Plavix registry, presented May 11 as a late-breaking clinical trial at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society.
BOSTONTo hold or not to hold, that may be the question on surgeons' minds as patients present for surgery. Should anticoagulation be continued at the time of surgery or held in fear of thromboembolic risk? According to Michael C. Giudici, MD, of Genesis Heart Institute in Davenport, Iowa, the complication risks may be similar for both options; however, he summed that in most cases anticoagulation can and should be continued.

BOSTONClosing the left atrial appendage (LAA) in high-risk atrial fibrillation patients who have an intolerance to warfarin proved safe and effective in a single-center observational trial presented at a late-breaking clinical session May 11 at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society.
BOSTONResults from the ARISTOTLE study showed that apixaban may give warfarin a run for its money, particularly for atrial fibrillation (AF); however, does the drugs benefits differ between the varying types of AF? A secondary analysis of the ARISTOTLE trial, presented May 11 at a late-breaking clinical trial session at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society, showed apixaban to take the cake in all subsets of AF patients when compared with warfarin.
BOSTONLeft ventricular (LV) lead placement at or next to the site of the latest mechanical activation shows a survival benefit over remote placement, and echocardiograph-guided targeting of the site with speckle tracking is superior to routine LV lead positioning during cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), according to trial results presented May 11 at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society.
BOSTONDynamic Atrial Overdrive (DAO) does not prevent new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF), is often not well tolerated and increases the risk of premature battery depletion, based on the results of ASSERT, a late-breaking clinical trial presented May 11 at the 33rd annual scientific sessions of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS). Therefore, the study authors recommended that implantable devices no longer get developed with this software.