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Mary C. Tierney, MS
Vice President & Chief Content Officer, TriMed Media Group
Mary joined TriMed Media in 2002. She was the founding editor and editorial director of Health Imaging, Cardiovascular Business, Molecular Imaging Insight and CMIO, now known as Clinical Innovation + Technology. Prior to TriMed, Mary was the editorial director of HealthTech Publishing Company, where she had worked since 1991. While there, she oversaw four magazines and related online media, and piloted the launch of two magazines and websites. Mary holds a master’s in journalism from Syracuse University. She lives in East Greenwich, R.I., and when not working, she is usually running around after her family, taking photos or cooking.
 - Mary Tierney

Cardiologists know that eating right combats cardiovascular disease—but having the time and knowledge to council patients on nutrition can be challenging. Nursing teams are challenged too. I remember a conversation with a cath lab nurse a couple of years ago when the Affordable Care Act brought a flood of newly insured patients into the system. She and her team were frustrated by the surge of patients, many of lower socioeconomics, whom did not know what eating healthy was.

 - Mary Tierney

The buzz is near constant on the link between good health and healthy living. But healthy living is hard work and easier said than done as we age.

 - Mary Tierney

We cut a finger and the skin heals. But what if hearts could heal too? Researchers recently found a molecule in newborns that might help, some day. The team at the Weizmann Institute of Science have identified a molecule found in newborns that appears to control the renewal process, assisting regeneration in damaged hearts.

 - Mary Tierney

Data released last month in JAMA revealed a 50 percent drop in the cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality rate among Americans between 1980 and 2015. That’s a clear victory—but CVD is still our nation’s leading cause of death.

 - Mary Tierney

Englishman John McCafferty holds the record as the world's longest surviving heart transplant patient. At the time of his surgery in the fall of 1982, physicians estimated he’d live five years. He lived another 30 on top of that—working, enjoying family, running half marathons, traveling, fundraising for a transplant support charity and trout fishing—before passing away just last summer.

 - Mary Tierney

The partnering of physicians and vendors has created and improved modern medicine. Collaborations have dawned new devices, systems, drugs, innovations and ways of diagnosing, treating and managing patients. Every day these advancements help to save and improve patient lives. But as we well know, partnership over the years also has overly feathered the pockets of some and bred a fair amount of fraud.

 - Mary Tierney

We know that inflammation is the root of much disease. But often getting rid of inflammation introduces more problems, for example, bleeding risks.

 - Mary Tierney

If you want something done well, ask a busy person. That was one of my dad’s adages over the years. The same is true in healthcare, as many studies have found that volume—busy-ness—and quality in medicine go hand in hand.

 - a-machacek

The vision was clear. The experienced heart and vascular team at the Northwestern Medicine Bluhm Cardiovascular Institute in Chicago needed a cardiovascular information system (CVIS) to stretch across its seven hospitals and 100 ambulatory care centers, physician offices and clinics. Like an architect constructing a solid foundation, they brought in a unified IT infrastructure to support enterprise-wide image reading, viewing, smart structured reporting and drive better quality, outcomes and efficiency. For this leading-edge health network, syngo Dynamics (Siemens) emerged as the enterprise-wide solution of choice for exchanging key patient images and data with the EMR, enabling near-instant, secure, HIPAA-enabled access to clinicians onsite and remote and ensuring interoperability across the enterprise.

 - Matthias Gotberg

At 12 months, patients with stable angina or acute coronary syndrome had similar rates of major adverse cardiac events whether they underwent revascularization guided by instantaneous wave-free ratio (iFR) or fractional flow reserve (FFR), according to a randomized, registry-based trial.